mostlysignssomeportents

Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? - a review (please reblog!)

mostlysignssomeportents:

image

Brian Fies's 2012 graphic novel Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? expresses a beautiful, melancholic and hopeful longing for (and suspicion of) the futuristic optimism of America’s 20th century, starting with the 1939 World’s Fair. Cory Doctorow finally got caught up with the future and read it.

Read the whole review…

bookshop
bookshop:

nympheline:

This is my favourite bookstore and bookseller in the world. Bar none.
I used to get to Seattle every six months or so, and whenever I visited I always made it a priority to stop in BLMF and ask its keeper what he’d been reading lately. He possessed an inexhaustible memory, a comfortable lack of snobbery, and impeccable taste. The first book he recommended to me, upon listening gravely to my litany of at-the-moment authors (Barbara Kingsolver, James Clavell, Maeve Binchy, Neil Gaiman, Charles DeLint, Anthony Bourdain) was Tipping the Velvet. He also later landed me with Geek Love, Anno Dracula, half the Aubreyad, and more modern Literature-with-a-capital-L than I could carry home.
The next-to-last time I dropped in, I asked if he had any P. G. Wodehouse.
"I have zero Wodehouse," he said, "and here’s why…"
Turned out that some fiend had taken to creeping in every month or so expressly to inquire of any Wodehouse and, once led to the volumes, to buy it all. ALL. Didn’t matter the condition, the edition, or whether he had another just like it in his possession; the villain bought every single P. G. Wodehouse in stock, every single time.
Was he a fan more comprehensive, more truly fanatical than any other I’d heard of, let alone known? Was he virulently anti-Wodehouse, only purchasing the books to keep their wry poison from infecting the impressionable masses? The world may never know.
I didn’t get any Wodehouse then, and I didn’t really feel the lack. I found plenty of other treasures that trip. But here’s one reason why BLMF and its proprietor are my favourite of their kind: that was two years ago, you see. Maybe three. In all that interim, I never planted foot in that bookshop. Never called. Never wrote. And I’m one face out of hundreds of thousands, dear reader; one reader he saw twice a year for three years, then not again for another three.
But I walked in the shop last Friday. Nodded hello.
"Can I help you find anything?" he asked, lifting his head from the phone.
"No, I’m good," I said.
"Wait—hold on a second." He set the phone down, walked ‘round the towers of books balanced precariously on the desk, on the floor, and atop other, only slightly less precarious towers. He jerked his head conspiratorially toward the far end of the shop, led me carefully to a shelf way in the back, removed a tattered stack of mass market paperbacks and motioned me closer to see what they’d been hiding.
Fifteen pristine Wodehouses: crisp, heavy, and—
“Hardcover,” he said, and waggled his eyebrows.
Reader, I bought them all.

oh my god as someone who once went on a quest to buy literally every volume of Jeeves & Wooster i could find in a 10-mile radius wherein I called up all the bookstores in Hampton Roads and begged them, I HAVE TO REBLOG THIS POST, because i still don’t have all the Wodehouses, much less *all in the same edition*, omg dream story

bookshop:

nympheline:

This is my favourite bookstore and bookseller in the world. Bar none.

I used to get to Seattle every six months or so, and whenever I visited I always made it a priority to stop in BLMF and ask its keeper what he’d been reading lately. He possessed an inexhaustible memory, a comfortable lack of snobbery, and impeccable taste. The first book he recommended to me, upon listening gravely to my litany of at-the-moment authors (Barbara Kingsolver, James Clavell, Maeve Binchy, Neil Gaiman, Charles DeLint, Anthony Bourdain) was Tipping the Velvet. He also later landed me with Geek Love, Anno Dracula, half the Aubreyad, and more modern Literature-with-a-capital-L than I could carry home.

The next-to-last time I dropped in, I asked if he had any P. G. Wodehouse.

"I have zero Wodehouse," he said, "and here’s why…"

Turned out that some fiend had taken to creeping in every month or so expressly to inquire of any Wodehouse and, once led to the volumes, to buy it all. ALL. Didn’t matter the condition, the edition, or whether he had another just like it in his possession; the villain bought every single P. G. Wodehouse in stock, every single time.

Was he a fan more comprehensive, more truly fanatical than any other I’d heard of, let alone known? Was he virulently anti-Wodehouse, only purchasing the books to keep their wry poison from infecting the impressionable masses? The world may never know.

I didn’t get any Wodehouse then, and I didn’t really feel the lack. I found plenty of other treasures that trip. But here’s one reason why BLMF and its proprietor are my favourite of their kind: that was two years ago, you see. Maybe three. In all that interim, I never planted foot in that bookshop. Never called. Never wrote. And I’m one face out of hundreds of thousands, dear reader; one reader he saw twice a year for three years, then not again for another three.

But I walked in the shop last Friday. Nodded hello.

"Can I help you find anything?" he asked, lifting his head from the phone.

"No, I’m good," I said.

"Wait—hold on a second." He set the phone down, walked ‘round the towers of books balanced precariously on the desk, on the floor, and atop other, only slightly less precarious towers. He jerked his head conspiratorially toward the far end of the shop, led me carefully to a shelf way in the back, removed a tattered stack of mass market paperbacks and motioned me closer to see what they’d been hiding.

Fifteen pristine Wodehouses: crisp, heavy, and—

Hardcover,” he said, and waggled his eyebrows.

Reader, I bought them all.

oh my god as someone who once went on a quest to buy literally every volume of Jeeves & Wooster i could find in a 10-mile radius wherein I called up all the bookstores in Hampton Roads and begged them, I HAVE TO REBLOG THIS POST, because i still don’t have all the Wodehouses, much less *all in the same edition*, omg dream story

nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

Stephan Eirik Clark's debut novel, Sweetness #9, is about a flavor chemist who develops an artificial sweetener that causes anxiety, rage, obesity and depression. Clark tells Terry Gross that the book Fast Food Nation inspired him to set his story in the food industry: 

"Flavorings were like gravity or electricity — something that was all around me, but that I had never paid any attention to, and as soon as I read that book and its chapter on food product design, I started to ask myself, ‘How important are these to the foods?’ I started to question if I was really eating food or just the idea of food. With these molecules, you can make something taste like grass or roasted chicken and what is it covering up? What is it supporting? What is it enhancing? All of these questions and philosophical ideas that sprang out of this simple industry just went off — and I found myself deep into a novel."

nprfreshair:

Stephan Eirik Clark's debut novel, Sweetness #9, is about a flavor chemist who develops an artificial sweetener that causes anxiety, rage, obesity and depression. Clark tells Terry Gross that the book Fast Food Nation inspired him to set his story in the food industry: 

"Flavorings were like gravity or electricity — something that was all around me, but that I had never paid any attention to, and as soon as I read that book and its chapter on food product design, I started to ask myself, ‘How important are these to the foods?’ I started to question if I was really eating food or just the idea of food. With these molecules, you can make something taste like grass or roasted chicken and what is it covering up? What is it supporting? What is it enhancing? All of these questions and philosophical ideas that sprang out of this simple industry just went off — and I found myself deep into a novel."

Why I hate blogging.

Why I hate blogging.

The kid and I spent the morning at the park, and when we came home I noticed a bit of an anomaly on the header above my blog page:

shea wong I hate blogging

My blog isn’t terribly popular – I don’t do ‘what I wore’ or ‘here is my kid’ photo posts, and I’m not big into recipes, etc. I tend to write about boring stuff like mental health and journalism, or birth trauma, or writing fiction. This stuff isn’t ‘hot’, but I like…

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metteivieharrison

maggie-stiefvater:

1. People overthink queries. Okay, so they are the only thing that an agent or editor might ever see of your work. So they have to embody everything about your personality and your books personality in a single page. So you will get absolutely nowhere if your queries suck, no matter if you’ve…

rosalarian

rosalarian:

senilesnake:

thinksquad:

Cops have been put on notice: Let the cameras roll.

Camera-shy cops across the city were reminded they can’t legally take action to stop someone from filming them while they’re on the beat, the Daily News has learned. The refresher was provided in a memo the chief of department’s office distributed to all police commands Wednesday.

“Members of the public are legally allowed to record police interactions,” the memo states. “Intentional interference such as blocking or obstructing cameras or ordering the person to cease constitutes censorship and also violates the First Amendment.”

Cops can take action if videographers and shutterbugs “interfere with police operations,” the memo notes.

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nypd-cops-told-memo-filmed-article-1.1898379

spread this like wildfire

when you see abuse, take out your phone and film that shit. 

Post it on youtube, send it to the news, let the whole world hear about it.

You don’t have to be any kind of official journalist. Anyone can do this. Never let them tell you differently.

mostlysignssomeportents

Multivariate analysis indicates that economic elites and organised groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on US government policy, while average citizens and mass-based interest groups have little or no independent influence.

In English: the wealthy few move policy, while the average American has little power.

mostlysignssomeportents

seanbonner:

Anonymous Audio Release Police Dispatch from the Mike Brown Shooting FergusonTapes

Incident begins at around noon..(9:08 time stamp)

ST. LOUIS COUNTY POLICE DISPATCH AUDIO TAPES, AUGUST 9TH 2014 11:05 AM - 6:05 PM, INCIDENT IS REPORTED AS “CROWD CONTROL PROBLEM” AT 12:05PM, NO SHOOTING MENTIONED UNTIL IT IS CALLED IN TO DISPATCH BY WITNESS. FERGUSON PD DENIES IT KNEW ANYTHING AT THAT TIME. NO EMS WAS CALLED.

EXCERPTS:

9:35: “Ferguson is asking for assistance with crowd control …”

10:58: “Now they have a large group gathering there, she doesn’t know any further…”

11:20: “We just got another call stating it was an officer-involved shooting …”

11:30: “Be advised, this information came from the news …”

11:55: “We’re just getting information from the news and we just called Ferguson back again and they don’t know anything about it …”

20:00: “…destruction of property …”

21:55: “They are requesting more cars. Do you want me to send more of your cars?”

43:55: “Attention all cars, be advised that in reference to the call 2947 Canfield Drive, we are switching over to the riot channel at this time …”

.